How to write case study

Topics: Scientific method, Case study, Qualitative research Pages: 26 (10283 words) Published: October 6, 2014
[email protected] Writing Guide

Case Studies
This Writing Guide was downloaded from the [email protected] Web Site at Colorado State University on October 6, 2014 at 1:36 AM. You can view the guide at http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=60. Copyright information and a citation can be found at the end of this document.

Main Page
This guide examines case studies, a form of qualitative descriptive research that is used to look at individuals, a small group of participants, or a group as a whole. Researchers collect data about participants using participant and direct observations, interviews, protocols, tests, examinations of records, and collections of writing samples. Starting with a definition of the case study, the guide moves to a brief history of this research method. Using several well documented case studies, the guide then looks at applications and methods including data collection and analysis. A discussion of ways to handle validity, reliability, and generalizability follows, with special attention to case studies as they are applied to composition studies. Finally, this guide examines the strengths and weaknesses of case studies.

Definition and Overview
Case study refers to the collection and presentation of detailed information about a particular participant or small group, frequently including the accounts of subjects themselves. A form of qualitative descriptive research, the case study looks intensely at an individual or small participant pool, drawing conclusions only about that participant or group and only in that specific context. Researchers do not focus on the discovery of a universal, generalizable truth, nor do they typically look for cause-effect relationships; instead, emphasis is placed on exploration and description.

Overview
Case studies typically examine the interplay of all variables in order to provide as complete an understanding of an event or situation as possible. This type of comprehensive understanding is arrived at through a process known as thick description, which involves an in-depth description of the entity being evaluated, the circumstances [email protected]: http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=60

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which involves an in-depth description of the entity being evaluated, the circumstances under which it is used, the characteristics of the people involved in it, and the nature of the community in which it is located. Thick description also involves interpreting the meaning of demographic and descriptive data such as cultural norms and mores, community values, ingrained attitudes, and motives.

Unlike quantitative methods of research, like the survey, which focus on the questions of who, what, where, how much, and how many, and archival analysis, which often situates the participant in some form of historical context, case studies are the preferred strategy when how or why questions are asked. Likewise, they are the preferred method when the researcher has little control over the events, and when there is a contemporary focus within a real life context. In addition, unlike more specifically directed experiments, case studies require a problem that seeks a holistic understanding of the event or situation in question using inductive logic--reasoning from specific to more general terms. In scholarly circles, case studies are frequently discussed within the context of qualitative research and naturalistic inquiry. Case studies are often referred to interchangeably with ethnography, field study, and participant observation. The underlying philosophical assumptions in the case are similar to these types of qualitative research because each takes place in a natural setting (such as a classroom, neighborhood, or private home), and strives for a more holistic interpretation of the event or situation under study. Unlike more statistically-based studies which search for quantifiable data, the goal of a case study is to offer new variables and...

Bibliography: Thrane, T. (1986). On Delimiting the Senses of Near-Synonyms in Historical
Semantics: A Case Study of Adjectives of 'Moral Sufficiency ' in the Old English
United Nations. (1975). Food and Agriculture Organization. Report on the
FAO/UNFPA Seminar on Methodology, Research and Country: Case Studies on
Van Vugt, J. P., ed. (1994). Aids Prevention and Services: Community Based
Research
Williams, G. (1987). The Case Method: An Approach to Teaching and Learning in
Educational Administration
Yin, R. K. (1993). Advancing Rigorous Methodologies: A Review of 'Towards
Rigor in Reviews of Multivocal Literatures. ' Review of Educational Research, 61, (3).
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